What I read in April 2020

Show Us Your Books day was Tuesday, but for some reason I thought it was next Tuesday so I’m late to the party! Oh well, better late than never, right? As in March, I didn’t read particularly much in April. I’m not really sure why. May is already looking much more promising! I read 11 books in April, which is not that little but isn’t many by my usual standards. But you didn’t come here to read my ramblings… let’s talk books!

I’m linking up with Jana and Steph, obviously.

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The Whisper Man by Alex North. Still devastated after the loss of his wife, Tom Kennedy and his young son Jake move to the sleepy village of Featherbank, looking for a fresh start. But Featherbank has a dark past. Fifteen years ago a twisted serial killer abducted and murdered five young boys. Until Frank Carter was finally caught, he was nicknamed “The Whisper Man,” for he would lure his victims out by whispering at their windows at night. As Tom and Jake settle into their new home, a young boy vanishes. His disappearance bears an unnerving resemblance to Frank Carter’s crimes, reigniting old rumours that he preyed with an accomplice. Now, detectives Amanda Beck and Pete Willis must find the boy before it is too late, even if that means Pete has to revisit his great foe in prison: The Whisper Man. And then Jake begins acting strangely. He says he hears whispering outside his window… This was creepy. There’s a little rhyme Jake says and I can just imagine kids freaking themselves out with it! There was a part in the middle that was a bit slow but overall this was a great police procedural/thriller with a hint of the possible supernatural. 4.5 stars.

Girl Friday by Jane Green. A year on from her divorce, Kit Hargrove feels she has got her life back on track. She has the perfect job – working for Robert McClore, the famous novelist – two wonderful children, a good relationship with her ex-husband and time to enjoy yoga with her friends. When her good friend and yoga instructor, Tracy, introduces her to Steve, Kit wonders if he could be the final piece of the jigsaw. But Kit doesn’t know that Tracy is hiding a secret, one that could destroy their friendship, her happiness with Steve, even her new life. I wanted something a bit fluffy after reading two thrillers in row but this was just… too much. Long-lost siblings, conspiracies, neglectful and dramatic mothers. It was a bit like reading the script for a soap opera. I also found the dialogue annoyingly simple. It’s not a terrible book by any means and I did finish it but it was just okay and honestly quite forgettable. Also, this book is supposed to be set in Connecticut didn’t believe for a minute that any of the characters were American! 2.5 stars.

When Mocking Birds Sing by Bill Coffey. Nine-year-old Leah’s invisible friend, who she calls “the Rainbow Man” seems harmless enough at first.  But then she paints a picture she paints for a failed toymaker, and hidden within it are numbers that help him win millions. Suddenly, townspeople are divided between those who see Leah as a prophet and those who are afraid of the danger she represents. Caught in the middle is Leah’s agnostic father, who clashes with a powerful town pastor over Leah’s prophecies and what to do about them. This is labelled as Christian fiction – definitely not my usual sort of read! But it doesn’t feel overly preachy. I found this to be an interesting and well written story. I wanted to know what I’m Earth was happening. I chose to interpret “the Rainbow Man” as neither an imaginary friend nor God but something else – possibly supernatural? Leah in my mind was something like Danny in The Shining. I hated the way most of the characters treated Leah – whatever they thought was or wasn’t happening she’s still just a little girl! I loved her friend Allie though. 4 stars.

The Wizards of Once by Cressida Cowell. Xar is a Wizard boy and Wish is a Warrior princess,in a world where wizards and warriors are mortal enemies. But Xar can’t seem to find his magic and Wish is in possession of a banned Magical Object that she must conceal at all costs. This is the tale of what happens when their two worlds collide. And while the two sides have been fighting could it be that Witches, the most terrifying being to ever walk the Earth, have returned? Wish and Xar are going to have to work together to figure out what’s going on and try to defeat their common enemy. This is a fun book and a quick read. I loved Wish and the sprites and Caliburn but honestly wanted to slap Xar. He’s so arrogant and annoying and just Did. Not. Learn. For supposedly being 13 he acted more like a petulant 8 year old. I also found some parts a little simple – something to do with the writing style maybe. I know it’s meant for children but children really don’t need to be talked down to – they understand quite a lot. It’s still an enjoyable adventure but I’ve read far better children#s books. 3.5 stars.

Five Feet Apart by Rachel Lippincott. Stella Grant likes nothing more than to be in control, despite the fact that her out-of-control lungs have had her in and out of hospital for most of her life. what Stella needs to control most is keeping herself away from anyone or anything that might pass along an infection and jeopardize the possibility of a lung transplant. Six feet apart. No exceptions. The only thing Will Newman wants to be in control of is getting out of this hospital. He couldn’t care less about his treatments, or a fancy new clinical drug trial. Soon, he’ll turn eighteen and then he’ll be able to unplug all these machines and actually go see the world, not just its hospitals. Will’s exactly what Stella needs to stay away from. If he so much as breathes on Stella she could lose her spot on the transplant list. Either one of them could die. The only way to stay alive is to stay apart. But suddenly six feet doesn’t feel like safety. It feels like punishment. Can they find a way to steal back a tiny bit of what cystic fibrosis has stolen from both of them? Just one little foot can’t hurt that much, right? I listened to the audiobook of this on Scribd and quite enjoyed it. I did find some parts of it unrealistic though – Stella went from thinking Will is arrogant and wanting nothing to do with him to being head over heels in love with him within a matter of maybe three weeks! I’m also not sure they’d be able to run around the hospital all the time however sneaky they thought they were being. But I did mostly enjoy it and it made me cry a couple of times so I gave it 4 stars.

Shadow Scale by Rachel Hartman. This is the sequel to Seraphina so I don’t want to say too much about it. Following on from the events of the previous book, war has broken out between the dragons and humans. Now Seraphina must travel the lands to find those like herself (if you’ve read the first one you’ll know what that means). As Seraphina gathers this motley crew, she is pursued by humans who want to stop her. But the most terrifying is another of her own kind, who can creep into people’s minds and take them over. Until now, Seraphina has kept her mind safe from intruders, but that also means she’s held back her own gift. With the fate of Goredd and the other human countries hanging in the balance, now she has to make a choice. I didn’t get into this book as quickly as I thought I would. I don’t remember Seraphina being quite so whiny and self-absorbed in the first book (I loved it in this one when Abdo told her not everything is about her!). The result was that it took me a week to read. But I ended up really enjoying it. The world building is spectacular! 4 stars, despite the slow start.

Once by Morris Gleitzman. Felix, a Jewish boy in Poland in 1942, is hiding from the Nazis in a Catholic orphanage. The only thing is, he thinks he’s there because his parents are travelling the world trying to get books for their bookselling business. When Fekix discovers that the Nazis are burning books, he runs away, intent on saving the bookshop – and his parents. Along the way he rescues a girl from a burning building, makes a Nazi with toothache laugh, and refuses to ever give up hope. This book is not enjoyable. Enjoyable is the wrong word. It’s compelling and sad, even horrifying. But strangely uplifting as well. It’s also an extremely fast read (for an adult). I want to continue the series and find out what happens to Felix and Zelda. 5 stars.

The Little Bookshop of Lonely Hearts by Annie Darling. Ever since her parents were killed, Posy Morland has spent her life lost in the pages of her favourite romantic novels in a crumbling London bookshop. But when Bookend’s eccentric owner, Lavinia, dies and leaves the shop to Posy, she must put down her books and join the real world. Because Posy hasn’t just inherited an ailing business, but also the unwelcome attentions of Lavinia’s grandson, Sebastian, AKA The Rudest Man In London™. Posy has a deadline of six months to get the bookshop back on its feet, and for once she’s pulled her head down out of the clouds and come up with a plan – if only Sebastian would leave her alone to get on with putting it in to practice. As Posy and her friends fight to save their beloved bookshop, Posy’s drawn into a battle of wills with Sebastian, about whom she’s started to have some rather feverish fantasies… I was in the mood got something heartwarming and fluffy and this book certainly delivered. It’s so cute and fun. Obviously it’s predictable – it’s a romance so as soon as a man is described as “annoying and rude” you know the girl is going to end up with him. I really enjoyed their interactions though and it’s set in a bookshop so obviously I was going to love it! It’s definitely not high literature and if I wanted to I could pick many holes in it, but I’m not going to. It was exactly what I needed at the time, and I gave it 5 stars based on sheer enjoyment.

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan. It is July 1962 and Edward and Florence, young innocents, are spending wedding night at a hotel on the Dorset coast. At dinner in their rooms they struggle to suppress their private fears of the wedding night to come – and unbeknownst to them both, the decisions they make this night will resonate throughout their lives. I liked this book. I found it intriguing and, in parts, awkward and disturbing. The cover describes it as “Wonderful, exquisite… devastating” but I wasn’t devastated  – more frustrated at the total inability to communicate and Edward’s seeming callousness. Nonetheless, it’s an interesting little read. 4 stars.

Odd Child Out by Gillian McMillan. Best friends Noah Sadler and Abdi Mahad have been inseparable since the day they met.  But when Noah is found floating unconscious in Bristol’s Feeder Canal, Abdi can’t – or won’t – tell anyone what happened. Just back from a mandatory leave following his last case, Detective Jim Clemo is now assigned to look into this unfortunate accident.  But tragedy strikes and what looked like the simple case of a prank gone wrong soon ignites into a public battle.  Noah is British. Abdi is a Somali refugee.  And social tensions have been rising rapidly in Bristol. Against this background of fear and fury, two families fight for their sons and for the truth. This is a kind of thriller, but you shouldn’t go into it expecting a traditional, fast-paced thriller. Nonetheless, I was hooked from the first page. It’s a story about friendship and being different, and partly also about prejudice. I felt so bad for Abdi. I wasn’t expecting the ending. I hadn’t realised this was book two in a series, but that didn’t affect my enjoyment. 4 stars.

Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi. In a small back alley in Tokyo, there is a café which has been serving carefully brewed coffee for more than one hundred years. But this coffee shop also offers its customers a unique experience – the chance to travel back in time. There are several catches though – customers must sit in a particular seat, they cannot leave the café, and finally, they must return to the present before the coffee gets cold. In this book, we meet four visitors, each of whom is hoping to make use of the café’s time-travelling offer, in order to: confront the man who left them, receive a letter from their husband whose memory has been taken by early onset Alzheimer’s, to see their sister one last time, and to meet the daughter they never got the chance to know. I’m torn on this one. I really liked the individual stories of the time travellers, but found I was left wanting more. Why can you go back in time if you sit on “the” chair? What was all the emphasis on how cool the café stayed even in winter all about? It felt like there were hints dropped throughout that there was going to be more to the overall framing story but the book never actually delivered on that – it was more like a series of vaguely connected short stories. I did genuinely enjoy reading the book though. It’s weird and wonderful and I would have been perfectly happy to read another story. And another. 4 stars.

OK, that’s all I’ve got for you today.

TL;DR: If you enjoy thrillers I recommend The Whisper Man. Those who like Children’s books should definitely read Once. Odd Child Out is a great book but be prepared for something slower than your usual thriller. And Five Feet Apart is good if you like YA and are willing to suspend you belief. Read the others if you think they sound like your kind of thing. Except Girl Friday. I do not recommend that one!

And now get thee to the link up for more book reviews.

15 thoughts on “What I read in April 2020

  1. I think I’ve tried to read the Whisper Man twice but haven’t been successful yet. Not because it’s bad, I have no idea if it is, but because I lacked reading mojo. It sounds so good though and I’ve been able to read thrillers again so hopefully, I’ll get to it soon! I think sometimes we underestimate the value (and power) of sheer entertainment. Sometimes we just want a book to make us forget and feel good!

  2. I enjoy The Whisper Man, too. I don’t do a lot of thrillers but I liked that one.
    Before the Coffee Gets Cold sounds super interesting… It stinks when you’re waiting for everything to tie together and it never does, though.

  3. As usual, your excellent reviews make me want to read many of the books (maybe not the first few!). I like the sound of Once! I hope to get to read that and a few of the other ones too! Re the Coffee gets Cold one, I always get annoyed when time travel things etc don’t get explained!

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