What I read in October 2020

Hello my lovelies! It’s my favourite day of the month – when I add even more books to my never-ending to-read list and try to fool myself into believing I will actually get to them soon 😉 But first let me tell you what I read last month. It’s slightly less than usual (although still a lot by most standards) because I was very busy making items for a Christmas auction (see my previous post if you’re interested).

Obviously I am linking up with Jana and Steph.

Assassin’s Quest by Robin Hobb. This is the third book in the Farseer Trilogy so I don’t want to say too much about it because it will definitely spoil the other two. But Fitz (of Fitzchivalry Farseer) is the illegitimate child of king-in-waiting Chivalry. His maternal grandfather brings him to the palace as a young child, where King Shrewd has him raised as the king’s assassin. In this book, as the title suggests, Fitz goes on a quest to save the kingdom. I started this book in September, but it is long and I read the last 200-ish pages in October. It’s really well written, the beginning is excellent and I love, love, love Nighteyes (Fitz’s wolf) but I just couldn’t seem to get into this book in the same way as the other two. I enjoyed it until about a third of the way through but then it started getting repetitive. Fitz stumbles onto some kind of danger/is captured or betrayed, manages to escape (with the help of Nighteyes or occasionally another character), continues his journey only to stumble into more danger. Lather, rinse, repeat. Also I was annoyed that after everything he’s been through he still wasn’t allowed any happiness. I sometimes get the feeling Robin Hobb hates Fitz – all she seems to do is pile more misery on him. I loved the development of Fitz and the Fool’s relationship and finding out more about the Fool’s background. So a mixture of good and not so good things that ultimately add up to 3 stars. I do plan to read the next book that’s set in this world though.

The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay. Seven-year-old Wen and her parents, Eric and Andrew, are staying at a remote cabin on a quiet New Hampshire lake. Their closest neighbours are more than two miles in either direction. As Wen catches grasshoppers in the front yard, a stranger unexpectedly appears in the driveway. Leonard is the largest man Wen has ever seen but he is young and friendly. Leonard and Wen talk and play until Leonard abruptly apologises and tells Wen, “None of what’s going to happen is your fault”. Then three more strangers arrive at the cabin carrying unidentifiable, menacing objects. As Wen sprints inside to warn her parents, Leonard calls out, “Your dads won’t want to let us in, Wen. But they have to. We need your help to save the world.” Thus begins an unbearably tense, gripping tale of paranoia, sacrifice, apocalypse, and survival that escalates to a shattering conclusion, one in which the fate of a loving family and quite possibly all of humanity are entwine. feel like I must have been missing something with this book. I didn’t find it “terrifying” or “glorious” (according to the blurbs by, among others, Stephen King). I enjoyed the beginning and I really liked Wen, but then there was what felt like pages and pages of the intruders saying “let us in” and the family saying “no, go away, you can’t come in” until they finally, inevitably, get in. After that the pacing was weird, alternately fast and slow. I couldn’t bring myself to care about any character other than Wen, the random bits of back story made me want the author to just get on with it and the ending felt cliché and clunky. Obviously this one was not for me. 2 stars.

Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson. (A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder #2). Having solved the murder case in book one, Pip Fitz-Amobi released a true-crime podcast about the murder with the help of Ravi Singh, and now it’s gone viral. Yet Pip insists her investigating days are behind her – she promised her parents. But she will have to break that promise when someone she knows goes missing. Jamie Reynolds has disappeared but the police won’t do anything about it. And if they won’t look for Jamie then Pip will, uncovering more of her town’s dark secrets along the way… and this time EVERYONE is listening. But will she find him before it’s too late? I didn’t love this book *quite* as much as the first one, I think I found the mystery more interesting in the first one, but this is still an excellent read. I adore Ravi, and I still think Pip and Cara have the best friendship. At one point Pip stays awake to watch Netflix with Cara via the phone since it’s the only way Cara can manage to fall asleep after the events of the first book. Could you actually ask for a better friend? I still think Pip’s dad is amazing and I love that her parents worry about her and try to keep her safe while at the same time treating her like the adult she (almost) is. I was actually suspicious about someone but couldn’t figure out who her would have been involved. It turned out I was right but didn’t have all the information. And I was also suspicious of someone who turned out not to be involved so I guess my detective skills aren’t all that after all 😉 4 stars, maybe even 4.5.

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides. “The shocking thing about the girls was how nearly normal they seemed when their mother let them out for the one and only date of their live.” In a quiet suburb of Detroit, the five Lisbon sisters- beautiful, eccentric, and obsessively watched by the neighbourhood boys – commit suicide one by one over the course of a single year. Twenty years on, their enigmatic personalities are embalmed in the memories of the boys who worshipped them and who now recall their shared adolescence. I don’t know what I thought this book was going to be, but definitely not what it actually is. I thought it would be darker, but the way it’s told I felt totally detached from the actual suicides. I really liked the writing, but I didn’t love the story itself. I liked this book okay, but it wasn’t amazing. I do want to give the author another chance though because the synopses of his other books sound really intriguing. 3 stars.

Sour Candy by Kealan Patrick Burke. At first glance, Phil Pendleton and his son Adam seem to be a perfectly ordinary father and son. They take walks in the park together, visit county fairs, museums, and zoos, and eat together overlooking the lake. Some might say the father is a little too accommodating given the lack of discipline when the child loses his temper in public. Some might say he spoils his son by allowing him to set his own bedtimes and eat candy whenever he wants. Some might say that such leniency is starting to take its toll on the father, given how his health has declined. What no one knows is that Phil is a prisoner, and that up until a few weeks ago and a chance encounter at a grocery store, he had never seen the child before in his life. This is such a weird little novella. Very creepy and the writing is excellent but I found the reveal somewhat lacklustre. I don’t really know what I was expecting instead though. Anyway, I liked it well enough and it was a quick read at only 82 pages. 3 stars.

The Legacy by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir. The only person who might have the answers to a baffling murder case is the victim’s seven-year-old daughter, found hiding in the room where her mother died – but she’s not talking. Newly promoted, out of his depth, detective Huldar turns to Freyja and the Children’s House for their expertise with traumatised young people. Freyja, who distrusts the police in general and Huldar in particular, isn’t best pleased. But she’s determined to keep little Margret safe. It may prove tricky. The killer is leaving them strange clues: warnings in text messages, sums scribbled on bits of paper, numbers broadcast on the radio. He’s telling a dark and secret story – but how can they crack the code? And if they do, will they be next? Fair warning: the murders in this book are BRUTAL! Not in a particularly graphic way – the actual deaths take place “off screen”, so to speak, but you find out how they were killed and it’s not nice to imagine. From the prologue I thought I knew what the motive was going to be and maybe which of two characters was doing it but I turned out to be wrong. This dark, compelling story is my first by this author and I definitely intend to continue the series. 4 stars.

Beartown by Frederick Backmann. Beartwon is a tiny community deep in the woods that doesn’t have much going for it – besides hockey team. Their junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semi-finals, and they actually have a shot at winning. All the hopes and dreams of this place now rest on the shoulders of a handful of teenage boys. Then something happens, something bad that leaves a young girl traumatized and a town in turmoil. Accusations are made and, like ripples on a pond, they travel through all of Beartown, leaving no resident unaffected. I had been minorly spoiled for this book before I read it so I knew what the bad thing was before I got to it (although for some reason I thought several people were involved – maybe I’m thinking of a different book?). I expected this book to devastate me but instead it made me ANGRY! So many characters I wanted to shake. But also a few who surprised me. This is an excellent book that deals with some every heavy topics. Highly, highly recommend. 5 stars.

The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Hermann. After the death of her sister, seventeen-year-old Violet Saunders finds herself dragged to Four Paths, New York – the town where her mother grew up. She soon finds out that she’s descended from one of the town’s founders doesn’t help much – a fact that causes most of the other residences to regard her with respect and something very like fear. When she meets Justin, May, Isaac, and Harper, all children of founder families, and sees the otherworldly destruction they can wreak, she starts to wonder if the townsfolk are right to be afraid. The town is home to the Gray – a lifeless dimension that imprisons a brutal monster. And the founder’s descendants are the only ones who can keep the monster at bay. Now the Gray is growing stronger every day, and its victims are piling up. When Violet accidentally unleashes the monster, she Justin, May, Isaac, and Harper must band together to unearth the dark truths behind their families’ abilities and save the town.I absolutely devoured this book (ha, I know, that was terrible). I loved the main character Violet, and also Harper. Justin was annoying but kind of grew on me. The atmosphere is great, very creepy. I’m still a bit confused about what the thing in the Gray actually is and where it came from but maybe book 2 will help with that. 4 stars.

Ghost Squad by Claribel A. Ortega. Many people would like to think that ghosts exist, but Lucely Luna knows they do. The spirits of her deceased family members live in her house, appearing as fireflies to everyone else. When something odd starts happening to her ghost family shortly before Halloween, Lucely and her best friend, Syd, cast a spell that accidentally awakens malicious spirits, wreaking havoc throughout their town. Together, they must join forces with Syd’s witch grandmother, Babette, and her tubby tabby, Chunk, to fight the haunting head-on, reverse the curse and save the town and Lucely’s firefly spirits before it’s too late. This book is great fun. At times it gets quite intense for a middle grade – I would have loved it as a child but others might find it too scary so maybe bear that in mind. I loved the cats named after Goonies characters and also that adults got involved and helped. I am always a fan of adults who aren’t totally oblivious to what’s going on with no good explanation to get them out of the way! The ending felt a little rushed and everything was wrapped up pretty quickly but overall it was a cute, fun read that was perfect for October. 3.5 stars.

The Chestnut Man by Søren Sveistrup. A psychopath is terrorizing Copenhagen. His calling card is a “chestnut man”, a handmade doll made of matchsticks and two chestnuts, which he leaves at each bloody crime scene. Examining the dolls, forensics makes a shocking discovery – a fingerprint belonging to a young girl, a government minister’s daughter who was kidnapped and murdered a year ago. A tragic coincidence—or something more twisted? To save innocent lives, a pair of detectives must put aside their differences to piece together the Chestnut Man’s gruesome clues. Because it’s clear that the madman is on a mission that is far from over. This book is pretty gory and quite dark. There are a few clichés of the genre in there – two cops reluctantly working together, at least one of them “troubled” with a tragic past. I figured out the culprit but but only fairly late in the book so it wasn’t a big deal. Overall it’s a pretty solid police procedural, but something about it didn’t quite live up to my expectations. 4 stars.

Vivian Apple at the End of the World by Katie Coyle. Unlike her recently devout parents, seventeen-year-old Vivian Apple never believed in the evangelical Church of America. But when Vivian returns home the night after the supposed “Rapture,” all that’s left of her parents are two holes in the roof. Suddenly, she doesn’t know who or what to believe. When a clue leads her to California, Vivian, her best friend Harp and a mysterious ally, Peter, embark on a desperate cross-country road trip through a paranoid and panic-stricken America to find answers. Because at the end of the world, Vivian Apple isn’t looking for a saviour. She’s looking for the truth. This is a fast read and I really liked some aspects of it. I love the characters, especially Harp. But there were some aspects that I had trouble believing or would have liked some explanation for – like where on Earth are all the other countries? Did nobody even notice that the US had been taken over by a doomsday cult? Also the ending was kind of anticlimactic. Trying not to give spoilers but after everything she went through and found out the way Vivian just eats breakfast then leaves without saying anything was just weird. I would definitely have a lot more to say! Will I read book 2? I’m not sure yet. 3.5 stars.

The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon. England, 1976. Mrs Creasy is missing and The Avenue is alive with whispers. The neighbours blame her sudden disappearance on the heat wave, but ten-year-olds Grace and Tilly aren’t convinced. Inspired by the local vicar, they go looking for God – they believe that if they find Him they might also find Mrs. Creasy and keep the rest of the avenue’s residence safe. As spunky, spirited Grace and quiet, thoughtful Tilly go door to door in search of clues, the cul-de-sac starts to give up its secrets, and the amateur detectives uncover much more than ever imagined. As they try to make sense of what they’ve seen and heard, a complicated history of deception begins to emerge. It seems everyone on the Avenue has something to hide, a reason for not fitting in. was a fun read. The writing is good and I loved the two girls most of the time – although Grace got a bit annoying with her constant hair flicking and insinuating that Tilly is too immature to understand anything because she’s something like a whole two months younger. Some of their misunderstandings were hilarious – I loved their conversation in church. I felt like there was a bit too much going on at times though – one mystery turned into everyone having half a dozen secrets. The only decent person in the whole street was the poor man everyone hated for absolutely no reason! Not quite as good as her later book, Three Things About Elsie, but still a decent read. 3.5 stars.

So, 12 books. A reasonable amount if not quite as many as other months. In case anyone couldn’t be bothered to read everything…

TL;DR: If you like YA I recommend both The Devouring Gray and Good Girl, Bad Blood (it can theoretically be read as a stand-alone but I would say read book 1 first). Beartown is not an enjoyable book but it’s a good one. The Chestnut Man and The Legacy are both decent – but dark – police procedural type thrillers. Most of the others are fine. The only one I personally do not recommend is The Cabin at the End of the World.

What have you been reading lately? And if you’ve read any of these what did you think – do you agree with me?

Don’t forget to visit the link up for even more book reviews!

24 thoughts on “What I read in October 2020

  1. Beartown will probably maybe always go down as one of the best books I’ve ever read! Not an easy read though, you’re right. I have the first Good Girl’s Guide to Murder out right now…starting it ASAP!!!

  2. The Chestnut Man sounds like a really good thriller. I’m always amazed at how much everyone reads in a month – I really thought I’d read more during lockdown!

  3. I loved The Chestnut Man.

    I have issues with Jeffrey Eugenides books. I don’t typically like them. I did really like The Virgin Suicides as a movie.

  4. I’ve had Beartown on my list for a while but the premise is very similar to something that happened in my town back when I was in grade school… So I think it’d make me very angry, too. I might have to check out Sour Candy and The Devouring Gray… They both sound eerily good!

  5. It took me forever to get through Beartown. I feel like it was a bit too long. But overall, it was a great book. The Cabin at the End of the World sounded really interesting at first and then I was like..ugh. I hate when a good premise isn’t done right.

  6. Darn – The Cabin sounded like it had potential in the beginning… I haven’t read The Virgin Suicides in years – might need to pick that up again 🙂 Thanks for sharing and enjoy your month!

  7. Twelve books is a good month! So I continue to add and then remove Beartown from my TBR list because with all that 2020 is slinging our way (what happens when president who was voted out acts like he’s not leaving?) I can’t deal with heavy. Conversely, maybe it’s the best time to read it?

  8. Such a bummer that you didn’t enjoy Cabin at the end of the world! I have that out form the library now. The Holly Jackson book sounds super good though! I love books with a podcast element. You had a pretty good reading month!

  9. I had a bad feeling about the Cabin and now I’m glad your review confirmed it and happy I haven’t picked up the book despite some positive reviews I saw. You read many interesting books last month, some of them intrigued me to read them as well. Thank you for sharing your reading experience with us.

  10. Cabin at the End of the World is a good example of why I read book reviews–based on reading the jacket or the first few pages, I’d be very interested in that book, but the things you didn’t like about it are things that would really annoy me, too! I have two “kept me reading all the way through but ultimately disappointed me” books in my latest reviews.

Leave a comment so I know you stopped by!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s