The books I read in March 2017

It’s hard to believe I’ve never actually participated in this link up before! Usually I would have some other opportunity to list recent reads and I wouldn’t want to have too many book posts. But I’m currently between reading challenges and the next one isn’t starting for a while, so I might as well tell you about the non-challenge reading I’ve been doing recently. I know some people break things down into categories, but I’m just listing my books in the order I read them.

I am linking up with Jana and Steph.

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First of all, in case anyone hasn’t already seen my final check-in post, I read all these books in March for the bonus round of Erin‘s challenge.

And now on to the other books I read in March…

The Lying Game by Sara Shepherd – For some reason I didn’t realise this was part of a series, then I was really confused when the end came (especially because my copy contained a preview of book 2, so I thought there was more left than there actually was…) then just as it started getting interesting it ended. Aargh! Most of the plot wasn’t really believable to me (how could anyone not realise that their daughter wasn’t, in fact, their daughter – especially after she literally told them at the start!) and 90% of the characters just weren’t likeable. But once I suspended ALL my belief it was actually kind of interesting. 4 stars.

The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood (book 2 of the Incorrigible Children series) – This one was even better than book one, and I really liked book one! The first book spent a lot of time setting the scene though, whereas more seemed to happen in this one. I was slightly annoyed by all the entirely unsubtle references to book 1 – it was like the author assumed I hadn’t actually read the first one! But apart from that it was great. 4 stars.

Among the Hidden by Margaret Peterson Haddix – This book has been on my wish list since about 2008! The idea sounded so intriguing – the life of a family’s third son in a world where the law forbids people to have more than two children. Unfortunately the book was a lot shorter than I was expecting and took ages to really get going. In such a short book I would have expected the action to start sooner! There are about a million books in the series though (well, 7) so I suppose it gets going properly later. Also, I think it’s aimed at younger children than I thought – I was expecting YA but it seems to be more for 11-12 year olds. 3 stars for this, but I will probably still give book 2 a chance.

Smart by Kim Slater – I loved this book, enough that I read it in one sitting even though it was pretty long and I ended up reading way past my bedtime. It reminded me a bit of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, but I loved that book as well. I loved Keiran, the (presumably autistic) narrator and was really glad things worked out for him in the end. An added bonus was the setting – it takes place in Nottingham, which is where I studied. 4 stars.

The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham – I initially intended this to be my “genre you rarely read” book for Erin’s challenge (science fiction), but I had to rearrange things after I’d already read it. I enjoyed this one more than I expected. It’s one of the more interesting disaster/end of the world books. For some reason I was under the impression that the “Triffids” were alien plants that came to Earth on a comet and started attacking/blinding people, but actually they are very much man-made… 4 stars.

Never Have I Ever by Sara Shepherd (book 2 of The Lying Game) –  I decided to give this series another chance, and I’m glad I did. This book was much better than the first one. Finally the “mean girls” are starting to show that they do have some personality under all that nastiness. I will have to keep reading because I really want to know whodunnit! 3.5 stars (4 on Goodreads because I tend to round up).

The Unseen Guest by Maryrose Wood (book 3 of the Incorrigible Children) – Still enjoying the series. I think they are getting better as they go along. This one still referred back to the previous two, but in a much less annoying way. More secrets are coming out, and I think I am starting to guess some connections but I need to keep reading to be sure. 4 stars.

The Interrupted Tale by Maryrose Wood (book 4 of the Incorrigible Children) – I had an evening to myself so I read this immediately after the previous one. This has been the best installment yet! Finally we got one or two answers, although I wish Miss Mortimer would reveal what she knows already. Only two more books to go (and book 6 isn’t even out yet!). How will I cope? 5 stars.

Super Awkward by Beth Garrod – Just snuck this one into March, as I read it on the 31st! I thought this was going to be like the Georgia Nicholson books, and in a way it was, but Georgia is much funnier – or maybe it’s just that I was younger when I read Angus, Thongs, etc. and could relate to it more? Anyway, at first I found this book really annoying. I kept thinking do teenagers really talk like that these days? In text speech? Do they really say things like “obvs” OUT LOUD? Am I old? Honestly, I thought about not finishing it, but I was reading in the bath so I didn’t really have another option to hand. Then things started to pick up more and I decided I did kind of like it after all. I would probably have loved this book to death at 15, but at almost 34 I’m afraid I’m too old for it. *Sigh*. 3 stars.

And that’s it. March was a most excellent reading month!

In case anyone is actually still here and interested, I  am currently reading The Sense of Style by Steve Pinker. It’s really good so far, but I’m useless at reading non-fiction so I’m getting through it at snail’s pace!

Have you read anything good lately?

Book challenge by Erin: bonus round complete

Yes, believe it or not I have actually finished my reading for the bonus round of Erin‘s book challenge! I thought I was going to finish sooner, but I had overlooked the rule that 5 of the bonus round picks have to have previously been chosen by somebody else doing the challenge, so I had to go back and change some categories that I had already finished (and then read the replacement books, of course). But last night I really, truly did read my final book! So here goes my final check in:

bonus books

10 points: Freebie – Read a book that is at least 200 pages.

I am changing this from American Psycho (see my review of that in last month’s check in post) to The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (306 pages; previously chosen). I absolutely adored this book! First, it’s about books and people who love books. It made me want to live above a book shop! It made me want to go and say hello to my books. But more than that, it is so heart-warming! There are sad moments, but overall it’s just a lovely, lovely book. I finished it with a huge smile on my face, which sounds cheesy, but it’s true! 5 stars. Recommended for everyone who considers books friends.

15 points: Read a book that starts with the letter “W”.

I am changing this one from Where She Went (again, my review is in last month’s post) to Wonder by R. J. Palacio (315 pages; previously chosen). Another heart-warming book that I absolutely loved! I’ve owned it since some time last year and now I’m wondering why I didn’t get round to it sooner (I suspect I prioritised reading for a previous challenge and then forgot I had this one). I loved Auggie and Summer and Via, and the book made me wish more people would “choose kindness” in real life. 5 stars.

15 points: Read a book with six words in the title.

All the Truth That’s In Me by Julie Berry (274 pages, 4 stars; previously chosen). This is a really hard book to review! I was confused by the setting – was it about a cult or was it set in an older time when extreme obedience to religion was just “normal”? There was no hint of anyone outside the community having more advanced technology, so maybe it wasn’t a cult but just set in the 16th century or something? Anyway, I enjoyed it a lot more than The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place by the same author. 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 on Goodreads.

25 points: Read a book with a homonym in the title.

Another change! I’m dropping The Handmaid’s Tale (review in last check in post) and moving Where She Went to this category (homonym = where/wear. Previously chosen, etc.). I reviewed it last time, so moving on…

30 points: (Submitted by Christina) Read a book set in the city/town/state/territory/county/province where you live.

Please nobody ever pick this category again! There are no books set in Basel! I ended up reading Banner in the Sky by James Ramsey Ullman (288 pages), which is set in a fictional Swiss village but mentions real places as well. It is incredibly cheesy, constantly going on about “destiny” and how climbing was “in (main character’s) blood”. He is compelled to leave work and go climb a mountain, nothing to do with him! However, it does get suspenseful towards the end and I think 11-12 year old boys who are into realistic adventure stories would like it. Personally I gave it 2 stars.

35 points: (Submitted by Peggy) Read a “Rory Gilmore” book.

In my preliminary list, I gave myself two choices, but I ended up reading neither of those. When The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgarov arrived and I read the synopsis I just had to read it straight away! Previously all I knew about it was that it somehow satirised the Soviet Union and was set in Russia and Jerusalem. Oh, and it was surprising that it made it through the sensors to be published. I wish somebody had told me sooner that it was about witches and vampires and the devil running amok in Moscow! It was completely and utterly bizarre and way more readable than I was expecting. I loved most of the Moscow parts and was bored by some of the Jerusalem parts. And I didn’t recognise most of the subtext until I read the notes at the end (clearly they were too subtle for me!). 4 stars.

35 points: (Submitted by Stef) Read a book from a genre that you’ve never read (or rarely read).

Since Erin is the most accommodating host ever, I was allowed to count plays as a genre and read Harry Potter and the Cursed Child for this (343 pages; previously chosen). Considering the last time I read a play was for my German Culture course at university it’s safe to say I rarely read this genre! And now I remember why… I don’t see the point in reading plays, unless you’re planning to act in them. Most plays work better on stage – the thing they’re intended for! And this one was no exception. While it was kind of nice to revisit the Harry Potter world and see how the author imagined their lives to have turned out, I honestly thought this addition was unnecessary. It was really a book about family issues, and the rest of the plot felt kind of contrived. That said, I bet it would be amazing to watch on stage if only for the scenery and special effects! As a book, I gave it 2 stars. Now can we please let Harry Potter rest and move on to other books?

40 points: (Submitted by Ferne) Read a book with time travel.

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North (405 pages; previously chosen). This book took me longer to read than I was expecting. It was good, but not so gripping that I couldn’t put it down and go to sleep. Parts of it were slow, but towards the end it picked up and then I did want to finish it in one sitting. Overall I thought it was an interesting take on the idea of “time travel” (of a sort) and reincarnation. Thought-provoking. 4 stars.

And that, as they say, is that! Phew. I read a few good books this time. None that I wouldn’t have picked up anyway at some point (if only because they’re on the BBC Big Read list!), but I did get round to a couple that have been on my list for a while. And now I have two months to read whatever I want before the next challenge starts in June.

Have I inspired you to read any of these books? Or, if you already have, did you agree with my opinions?

Book challenge by Erin 6.0: bonus round check in 1

Today I am checking in for the bonus round of Erin‘s current reading challenge. Don’t worry, I haven’t finished already 😉 Although I am quite impressed that I got through my choice for “favourite author”…

Here’s what I read for the challenge in February:

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10 points: Freebie – Read a book that is at least 200 pages.

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis (399 pages). I had absolutely no idea what this book was about – had never seen the film and somehow had never heard anything about it. Turns out there is no real story. Not one with a beginning, middle and end anyway. Instead we just follow the titular psycho around while he socialises and shops and eats in New York City. Oh, and occasionally kills someone… brutally, graphically, violently. Obviously I was expecting it to be disturbing and graphic, but it was so much more disturbing than I was expecting. Especially towards the end. What I was not expecting was constant references to Donald Trump. Even in fiction I can’t escape him! I gave it 4 stars but I will never, ever read it again!

15 points: Read a book that starts with the letter “W”.

I had two choices for this one, but I decided to read Where She Went by Gayle Forman (264 pages) because it had been on my list longer. Also there are extra bonus points for choosing books that someone had already chosen for the challenge. I must have loved If I Stay because as soon as I finished it I knew I needed to read the sequel, but by the time I got round to reading this one I only had a vague recollection of the story. I still know the main outline, obviously, and I remember crying a lot, but the details are gone. Hmm. Anyway, I really loved this one. I was devastated for Adam and once Mia came back on the scene I really felt for her as well. It made me think about what I would have done in her situation. 5 stars.

20 points: Read a book that has a (mostly) green cover.

green-coverThe Day We Disappeared by Lucy Robinson (434 pages). This book was not at all what I was expecting! I thought it would be some kind of chick lit/romantic comedy, and in a way it is, but it’s also so much more than that. There is romance, but there’s also a mystery and parts of it are very dark. It deals with mental health and there is a twist that I truly was not expecting. I don’t really know how to review this any further without giving things away, so I’ll just say you should definitely give it a chance. It got 4 stars from me anyway. Photo to the left to prove the cover is green 😉

25 points: Read a book with a homonym in the title

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (324 pages; homonym = tale/tail). I had literally zero idea what this book was about. All I knew was that it’s some kind of classic and people seem to rate it highly. And it’s number 131 in the BBC Big Read list so I would have had to read it no matter what. It turns out that it’s really good, and also incredibly relevant right now given the current political situation in various countries. The story is a bit disjointed and vague, which would probably annoy some people, but I actually thought that was quite a clever tactic – it let you fill in the blanks yourself (potentially with even worse things than the author was imagining) and reinforced the fact that the narrator was very much kept in the dark. At the time it was written this book probably seemed extreme and nobody believed it could ever actually happen. I might have thought that myself if I had read it 10 years ago. But now, in 2017, I’m not so sure. 5 stars.

25 points: (Submitted by Linda) Read a book by your favourite author

I could never pick just one favourite author, so I chose from among the few I always list when asked. Stephen King has been a favourite ever since I read Insomnia when I was far too young to actually understand what I was reading. For this challenge, I read The Stand (1439 pages). Although I love King’s writing, my one problem with him is that he has a tendency to go on and on, long past when he should have stopped. This book is definitely one that could have done with being shorter. Admittedly it’s partly my own fault for reading the uncut edition, but even the original was 817 long, long pages. On the positive side, the writing was, as always, excellent, as was the characterisation – King always makes me feel like his characters are real, and it’s amazing how different he makes them all. How does he manage to get into the minds of such a variety of people? The story of the plague that destroyed the world and the struggles of the few survivors made a really compelling story. However, the supernatural element felt out of place in this one. The whole good versus evil, or God versus the devil (or someone like him) sub-plot made no sense, especially given the ending. Trying not to give too much away, but in my opinion “good” didn’t even defeat “evil” in this book – a few good guys turned up where the good guys were and then something accidental happened and the day was saved… but not by the people who had trekked all that way to save the day. What? It almost felt like King had got that far with the story and had no idea how he even wanted to end it. Minus one star for that. I still gave it 4 though because I really did enjoy reading it – and got through all those pages surprisingly quickly.

And that’s it. I’m halfway through the bonus round with two months to go.

Are you taking part in this challenge? Read anything good recently?

Book Challenge by Erin 6.0: Bonus round

I know, I know… you were hoping for a break from book challenge posts now that I completed Erin’s challenge within a month. Unfortunately for you, there’s a bonus round, and I’m here to share my preliminary list. I do have some travel posts planned as well (need to tell you about New Year!) and I promise they will be coming soon, but for now it’s back to books.

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The categories are the same as for the initial round, but you get an extra 5 points per category this time. Here are my picks. I’m fairly sure I won’t get through them all again, but it’s worth a try.

10 points: Freebie – I’ve already started reading American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis, so that’s my freebie. Apart from being generally disturbing (which I was expecting), it’s full of references to Donald Trump. What’s that all about? I’d never even heard of Donald Trump in 1991, which is when this book came out. Although to be fair I was only 7/8 in 1991 and hadn’t heard of most people 😉

15 points: Read a book that starts with the letter “W” – I have two choices for this. Either Where She Went by Gayle Forman (sequel to If I Stay) or We Never Asked for Wings by Vanessa DIffenbaugh.

15 points: Read a book with six words in the title – I’m trying to read books that are already on my shelves this time round, so my choices seem to be Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (which the lovely Kerri sent me) or All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry.

20 points: Read a book that has a (mostly) green coverThe Day We Disappeared by Lucy Robinson is the only green book on my shelves.

25 points: Read a book with a homonym in the titleThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Homonym is obviously tale/tail. Imagine a book called “The Handmaid’s Tail”? I would definitely read that!

25 points: (Submitted by Linda) Read a book by your favourite author – As I said last time, I don’t have a favourite author! And a good job too, otherwise I would have to read another book by Tana French and I’ve read all hers now. This time round I’m choosing Stephen King, who is definitely up in my top 5, and tentatively saying I’ll read The Stand. No promises though – much as I love King’s writing, this book is long!

30 points: (Submitted by Christina) Read a book set in the city/town/state/territory/county/province where you live – Hahaha, this is just hilarious. I couldn’t even find a book set in Basel the first time round! I’m going with just Switzerland again as the closest I can get and plan to read Banner in the Sky by James Ramsy Ullman. It sounds ridiculously cheesy, but what can ya do? I hope it will at least be a quick read.

35 points: (Submitted by Peggy) Read a “Rory Gilmore” book – Again, I have two choices. Either The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco or Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. neither sounds like a particularly easy read though.

35 points: (Submitted by Stef) Read a book from a genre that you’ve never read (or rarely read)The Day of the Jackal is a spy thriller, apparently. Since I didn’t even know that was a genre, I think it’s safe to say I rarely read books from it 😉

40 points: (Submitted by Ferne) Read a book with time travel – Maybe I’ll finally get round to reading Outlander? A second option is The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North.

And that’s it for this round. Have you read any of these? Any suggestions for what to read once I’m done with American Psycho?

 

Book Challenge By Erin 6.0: Complete

I woke up early this morning and couldn’t get back to sleep, so I decided to make the most of my time and read the last remaining book I needed to complete Erin‘s latest reading challenge. My preliminary list was here, for those who are interested. I did end up changing my picks for one or two categories…

challenge-books

5 points: Freebie – Read a book that is at least 200 pages.

The Disappearance by Annabel Kantaria (382 pages). I guessed most of the twists in this one before the end, well kind of at least… one event didn’t go down exactly as I thought it had. Parts of the story felt vaguely familiar as well, which spoiled my enjoyment a bit. I ended up giving this one 3 stars.

10 points: Read a book that starts with the letter “W”.

Without a Trace by Lesley Pearse (406 pages) – which I forgot to include on the photograph with the others. I quite enjoyed this, although it wasn’t as good as other books I’ve read by the same author. Everything seemed to come out too well in the end. It was an intriguing mystery though. 4 stars.

10 points: Read a book with six words in the title.

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez (434 pages). I’m not sure I’d call what I was reading about here “love”… obsession maybe? And – trying not to give too much away – there was one extremely disturbing aspect of the storyline. The writing was good though. 4 stars.

green-book

15 points: Read a book that has a (mostly) green cover.

I was stuck on this one, but then the lovely Alison who blogs at View from the Teapot sent me a green book – The Conjuror’s Bird by Martin Davies (305 pages). Part love story, part mystery, part historical fiction, this is not a book I would have picked up myself but it turned out to be really enjoyable. My only complaint is that there were three stories within the book and I felt like none of them got the attention they deserved in such a short book. 4 stars. Photo to the left to prove it’s green 😉

20 points: Read a book with a homonym in the title.

The Secret by the Lake by Louise Douglas (410 pages), with the homonym being by (buy/bye). I really wanted to enjoy this book. It was spooky and atmospheric with a family tragedy and a mystery from the past… but somehow it didn’t really suck me in. I got through it quickly enough but ended up feeling unsatisfied. And I guessed one of the big things that was going on way before the end. A rather meh 3 stars.

20 points: (Submitted by Linda) Read a book by your favourite author.

I don’t have a favourite author (although I might say Terry Pratchett if absolutely forced to choose), so I read a book by one of the authors I can’t get enough of: The Trespasser by Tana French (468 pages). I have enjoyed all of her books, although the first one disappointed me slightly, and each one seems to get that little bit better. I LOVED this one and gave it 5 stars.

25 points: (Submitted by Christina) Read a book set in the city/town/state/territory/county/province where you live.

Yeah, it doesn’t say country anywhere here, but I’m hoping Erin will let this count anyway. I did find one book that was set in Basel but it turned out not to be long enough, so I read And Both Were Young by Madeleine L’Engle (238 pages). It is set in Switzerland, but in the French-speaking part, somewhere near Lake Geneva. It’s a boarding school book, and I do love a good boarding school book (I’m still trying to collect all the Chalet School books!). This one is quite a sweet one and has all the “traditional” ingredients – awkward or unlikeable girl realises things aren’t so bad and manages to make friends. It takes place just after World War 2 and I felt like the events of the war were glossed over a bit, despite being a major plot point, which is why I only gave it 4 stars.

30 points: (Submitted by Peggy) Read a “Rory Gilmore” book.

I read High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (245 pages) just this morning. It was a quick and fairly easy read, full of fun pop culture references (I’m sure you all know the story). However… and pay attention to this  next bit because I doubt I will ever say/type it again… the film was better! Something about the story just seemed to work better on the screen… Only 3 stars for this one.

30 points: (Submitted by Stef Read a book from a genre that you’ve never read (or rarely read.)

The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat (444 pages) is a war story and I really don’t like war stories… usually. This one surprised me by actually being quite readable! It’s basically a story of the British navy’s part in World War 2, focusing on a particular ship that had the job of escorting non-navy ships to their destinations. 4 stars.

35 points: (Submitted by Ferne) Read a book with time travel.

All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terril (360 pages). I absolutely loved this book! The writing style, the characters. And even though it’s about time travel, it wasn’t too sci-fi-ish (if that makes any sense?). It was basically an action/adventure/romance that just happened to involve travelling back in time. Highly recommend! 5 stars.

And that’s all. I’m amazed that I actually managed to read all my books within the first month of the challenge! And 3 of them also count for the BBC Big Read, which is nice. Now I shall await the bonus round…

The Book Review of 2016

I totally stole this from Kezzie. I think it’s a fantastic way to look back on the books I read last year!

2016-books

Best book you read in 2016:

This is really hard, but I think I would have to go for either Saturday Requiem by Nicci French or Different Seasons by Stephen King.

Best children’s fiction:

I don’t read a lot of “children’s” fiction as stuff, more YA. I think Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell counts as children’s?

Best crime fiction:

Oooh, this is hard! I read a lot of crime fiction! I will choose Friday On My Mind by Nicci French since Saturday requiem already got a mention above.

Best classic:

I suppose it depends a bit on what you actually consider a “classic”. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey was good, but if 1962 is too modern then Kim by Rudyard Kipling was my highest rated “true” classic of 2016.

Best non-fiction:

I read very little non-fiction, and I think I only read 2 or 3 non-fiction books again in 2016! Papillon by Henri Charrière is an autobiography and therefore technically non-fiction, but reads like a novel so I loved it. (Basically I prefer my non-fiction disguised as a story 😉 ).

Best dystopian fiction:

Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman, without a doubt.

Best YA:

I want to say Noughts and Crosses again but that seems unfair, so Among Others by Jo Walton.

Most surprising (in a good way) book read in 2016:

Titus Groan by Mervyn Peake was actually quite good, which I didn’t expect at all! Strange, but good. (I only read it because I need to read the sequel, Gormenghast, for the BBC Big Read). The Secret History by Donna Tartt is another one that I went into with no idea what to expect and ended up really enjoying it.

Book You Read In 2016 That You Recommended Most To Others:

I don’t really recommend books as such. I review some on my blog and say which I’ve liked, but I can’t remember a single real-life conversation where I’ve actually recommended a book!

Best series you discovered in 2016:

I didn’t really discover any series in 2016, just read books from series I already love. Noughts and Crosses is the first in a series though, so I’ll say that even though I have no idea whether anything beyond book 1 is any good…

Favourite new author you discovered in 2016:

I’m going with new to me rather than author who released their debut. To avoid repeating previous answers I’ll say Nicola Yoon.

Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love But Didn’t

Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay. I had heard the TV series was really good and the idea of a serial killer who only kills “bad” people was intriguing. Well, the TV series may or may not be amazing, but this book is most definitely not amazing. It wasn’t particularly thrilling and half the time it almost felt like it was written for children. Except with more violence and prostitutes than is generally allowed in children’s fiction.

Best Book That Was Out Of Your Comfort Zone Or Was A New Genre To You

I’m not even sure what genre Shogun by James Clavell is. Nautical fiction? Japanese historical fiction (told by a westerner)? A war story? Not a clue! But I am very sure I would never have picked it up if it hadn’t been on the BBC Big Read list. I would never read it again, but I did mostly enjoy it.

Book You Read In 2016 That You’re Most Likely To Read Again In 2017:

I highly doubt I will read anything again as soon as that, but I will probably read As Chimney Keepers Come to Dust by Alan Bradley again at some point (along with the rest of the Flavia de Luce series, but I only read that one in 2016).

Favourite Book You Read in 2016 by an Author You’ve Read Previously:

Ohhh, that’s difficult! Again, I think I will go with avoiding repetition rather than necessarily choosing the absolute best and say Gavin Extence.

Best Book You Read In 2016 That You Read Based SOLELY On A Recommendation From Somebody Else:

I read Enchanted August by Brenda Bowen because another blogger suggested it as a book featuring a character with my name. Sadly it wasn’t that great, but I can’t think of any other book I read solely based on recommendation and weren’t already on my list.

Favourite Cover of a Book in 2016:

Again, assuming books I read in 2016 rather than ones published in 2016. I loved the cover of The Girl Who Couldn’t Read by John Harding (and I enjoyed this sequel much more than the first book!). Here it is:

book-cover

Book That Had The Greatest Impact On You In 2016:

I keep repeating myself, but probably Different Seasons by Stephen King. Specifically the novella Apt Pupil. It really brought it home that you can’t spot “evil” just by looking at people, and that literally anyone can be responsible for bad things.

Book You Can’t BELIEVE You Waited Until 2016 To Read

The Color Purple by Alice Walker. I put off starting it so many times, then once I picked it up I had no idea why I didn’t read it sooner!

Book That Had A Scene In It That Had You Reeling And Dying To Talk To Somebody About It? (a WTF moment, an epic revelation, a steamy kiss, etc.) Be careful of spoilers!

Is it weird that I can’t think of any? Possibly the final scene in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. All I could think was “Uhh, what just happened?!”.

Favourite Relationship From A Book You Read In 2016 (be it romantic, friendship, etc)

Carolina’s relationship with her grandfather in Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eager. From not even knowing him at the start of the book to the events of the ending… it was just so perfect.

Most Memorable Character In A Book You Read In 2016:

In the interests of fairness, I will pick a new to me character (because obviously I find the characters in the series I already love memorable!). Will from If I Fall, If I Die by Michael Christie is my choice. For someone who had never been outside he took to it like a duck to water.

Genre You Read The Most From in 2016:

To be sure I would have to go through all my books, and I’m not going to do that, but I would guess crime/thrillers.

Book That Was The Most Fun To Read in 2016:

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde. Less fun than his Thursday Next series, but still very quirky and funny. Maybe I should have picked the Quarkbeast as my most memorable character? 😉

Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2016:

Okay, confession: lots of books make me cry. So much so that I can’t remember any specific ones from 2016. I’m pretty sure Among Others made me cry a couple of times though. Oh, and I definitely cried at the end of Hour of the Bees.

Book You Read in 2016 That You Think Got Overlooked This Year Or When It Came Out:

The Mirror World of Melody Black came out in 2015, but I had never heard of it until it came up on Goodreads. It deserves more attention if only to raise awareness of mental illness.

Total number of books read in 2016:

Goodreads says 83, so unless I forgot to enter any there I’ll stick with that number. I know some people read 100 and more books, but considering one of mine was 1,210 pages long I think I can live with 83 😉 My goal was only 75 so I’m happy.

How was your 2016 reading year? If you decide to answer these prompts let me know so I can come and by nosy!

Semi-Charmed Winter 2016 Book Challenge complete!

Hi all! I hope you all had wonderful holidays (whether you celebrate Christmas or not) and made it to the new year healthy and happy!

For my first post of 2017, I am checking in for the Semi-Charmed Winter 2016 Reading Challenge, which I completed yesterday, managing to finish my final book while waiting for a delayed flight. Here’s what I read since the last time I checked in:

books2016

20 points: Read a modern retelling of a classic.

I read Splintered by A. G. Howard, with the classic being Alice in Wonderland. This book is kind of a mixture of sequel to Alice in Wonderland (the main character is a descendant of Alice who goes back to Wonderland) and a retelling of the original (the story discusses the original book as if it were real and C.S. Lewis had just misunderstood/got things wrong, and so retells the story as it “really” happened in this particular world). I thought this book was just okay. The discussion of mental illness was awful – for a supposedly modern-day story the treatment seemed very old-fashioned and harsh. The love triangle was unnecessary, Morpheus was such a caricature  of “bad guy” that I couldn’t take him seriously most of the time and Jeb annoyed me from the very start. But the actual writing was good and the reinterpretation of Wonderland was imaginative and interesting. I gave this one 3 stars.

30 points: Read a book with a character that shares your first or last name.

Thanks to fellow blogger Jamie I was actually able to find something for this! I read Enchanted August by Brenda Bowen. Interestingly, the character named “Beverly” (not my spelling, but oh well) is actually male in this book, which Beverley was before someone, somewhere decided it sounded more feminine. This was a quick read and nothing particularly special. I liked the descriptions of the scenery on the island and the changing relationships between the four main characters. The storyline with the two husbands annoyed me though – both couples had been having problems, but the minute the husbands appeared on the island all the wives wanted to do was have sex and forget anything else had ever happened. Uhh, no! Apparently this is a modern retelling of The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Armin (which I had never heard of!) so I may give that one a go. Enchanted August gets 3 stars from me.

30 points: Read two books: a nonfiction book and a fiction book with which it connects.

I had started reading The Once and Future King for this, but I realised that will be one I need to pick up and put down a lot over a longer period of time so I changed my mind. Instead I read The Asylum by John Harwood (fiction) and Bedlam: London and Its Mad by Catharine Arnold (non-fiction). The connection is asylums, or mental illness, or treatment of mental illness in Victorian times. You pick!

I really enjoyed The Asylum. It’s a little sensationalist maybe and there are a lot of events crammed in at the end with lots of complicated links between characters and weird coincidences. But while reading it I had no problem with suspending my belief and taking all the action at face value. Despite the subject matter (person incorrectly imprisoned in an asylum), it’s a surprisingly fun read and I got through it pretty quickly. 4 stars.

Bedlam had some interesting information and provides a starting point for people who want to know about Victorian treatment of mental illness and the history of asylums, but overall I felt like the author had tried to fit too much subject matter into a short book. Just as I started to get interested in something that topic was finished with and it was on to the next one. Particularly the final case studies and discussion of madness in literature section felt rushed and incomplete. 3 stars.

And that’s it. Done! Erin’s latest book challenge started on 1 January so I will be moving on to that now, starting with The Secret by the Lake by Louise Douglas.

Oh, and speaking of reading challenges, I’ve set my Goodreads goal for this year as 78.

What reading goals have you set yourself for 2017? Will you be taking part in any challenges?