Neighbourhoods Around the World – Karlsruhe

Show me your neighbourhood around the world

A slightly different blog post today. I’m taking part in a series hosted by Annabelle over at The Piri-Piri Lexicon – Show me your neighbourhood around the world. The idea of this series is to take a little tour of other people’s neighbourhoods around the world through the lense of their camera. Every two days between now and the end of November, a different blogger will showcase their own nighbourhood and town. You can see who else is taking part and where else the tour is taking us by clicking on the link I included earlier. But for now, let’s have a look at Karlsruhe. I live in the Südstadt (literally “south city”) district.

First of all, I should tell you the rules:
– All photos must be of the town/neighbourhood you live in or are well acquainted with.
– All must have been taken by you.
– Please publish a maximum of 12 photos.
– 6 photos that MUST be included:

  1. a playground / play area
  2. a local mode of transport
  3. a typical house/building
  4. a street nearby
  5. a school, nursery or other education facility
  6. a market, supermarket or other shopping outlet

– (Up to) 6 other photos are up to you. Think typical and local.

I’ll start with my six mandatory photos. Most of them were taken in the rain purely because the last time it wasn’t raining, or at least cloudy, in Karlsruhe, I was at work in another city and therefore unable to take photos!

A playground:

This is one of three small play areas that are all in a row on the so-called “Grünstreifen” (green strip).

Play area

One advantage of taking photos of playgrounds in the rain is that you don’t have to worry about disturbing any children! Also, I’m pretty sure those little red elephants are mandatory for all German play areas… they’re everywhere 😉

A local mode of transport:

S-Bahn

The bright yellow trams and S-Bahns are a familiar sight in Karlsruhe. Trams are the smaller ones that serve the city and its suburbs, while the larger S-Bahns are capable of travelling on both tram tracks and the proper Deutsche Bahn train tracks and can thus travel to further away places, like Baden Baden or Germersheim.

A typical house/building:

There are probably single-family houses somewhere on the outskirts of Karlsruhe (like Waldstadt maybe?) but if, like me, you live in a fairly central part of town, you will definitely be housed in a flat (apartment).

Building

I chose the above building for my photo on the advice of Jan, who tells me that particular pattern of bricks is typical for the area. Lots of flats are located in buildings that have something else on the ground floor – in this case, it’s a bar.

A street nearby:

I didn’t want to post a photo of my own street on here (I have photos of myself… I’d prefer not to have them associated with an address, however vague) but here’s one in my neighbourhood. This is pretty typical for the part of Karlsruhe I live in:

Karlsruhe street

A school, nursery or other education facility:

Not being a parent or having particularly close contact with anyone who has children of school age, I have no idea about any of the schools in Karlsruhe. I know of three schools within 2-3 streets of where I live, and I chose to take a photo of this one purely because the building it’s in looks nice:

Karlsruhe school

Here’s another photo, from a different angle:

Karlsruhe school 2

Looking at the signs outside, I gathered that this building houses a Grundschule (primary school) and Realschule (secondary school for pupils who are seen as not too bright and therefore not expected to go on to study. The other secondary school forms are Gymnasium, which prepares the most intelligent kids for university, and Hauptschule for those children who are considered suiltable for only the most menial of tasks, such as collecting rubbish or factory work. Some areas also have Gesamtschulen, i.e. comprehensives, which are supposed to be for everyone, but in reality parents of the most intelligent children still send them to Gymansium, leaving the Gesamtschulen full of pupils who would otherwise have gone to Realschule or Hauptschule).

A market, supermarket or other shopping outlet:

I wasn’t sure about the policies on taking photos inside supermarkets, so I took the following very surreptitously using the camera on my phone, hence the terrible quality!

The above photos were taken at Scheck-In Center, one of the larger supermarkets in Karlsruhe. It’s actually pretty close to where I live, but I rarely go there because the way it’s located in relation to my flat means it’s so much more convenient for me to go into town. But the other day I arrived at the train station to find that the next tram going anywhere useful would take me to Scheck-In, so off I went. Apart from selling all the usual goods you need for everyday life, Scheck-In Center is one of the places to go for anything you can’t find at “normal” supermarkets – such as vanilla extract or Cheddar cheese.

And now for some additional photos to hopefully give you an idea of what life is like in Karlsruhe.

Karlsruhe Hauptbahnhof

Unless you come by car, the above “Hauptbahnhof” (main train station) is the first thing you will see in Karlsruhe. And if you’e a commuter, like me, you’ll feel like you spend half your life there! The original train station was further North (for those who know Karlsruhe, it was on Kriegstraße, between Ettlinger Tor and Mendelsohnplatz), but in 1902, the Baden parliament decided to build a new one to make room for the expanding city. Construction began on the current Hauptbahnhof in 1910 and it opened in the night between 22 and 23 October 1931, meaning it will be celebrating its 100th anniversary in just over a week’s time!

Notice all the bikes in the picture as well. I could have used a picture of a bike for my local mode of transport… people in Karlsruhe loooooove to cycle!

As soon as the sun comes out even a little bit, the grounds of Karlsruhe’s castle are the place to be! Everyone and anyone can be found there – people walking their dogs, teenage girls sun bathing, students drinking beer, people playing with frisbees, joggers, parents running around after children….

A rather wet Schlosspark
A rather wet Schlosspark

The only people around when I took the above photo were either walking their dogs or just passing through on their way to somewhere else – although I did spot one dedicated jogger! You certainly wouldn’t catch me jogging in such weather (although I apparantly have no problem going out in the rain for the sake of my blog… I suppose it’s a matter of opinion who is more crazy).

It might be raining, but I still need my walk!
It might be raining, but I still need my walk!

Karlsruhe pyramid

The pyramid on Marktplatz (Market Square) is one of Karlsruhe’s main landmarks. I bet there are very few residents who have never uttered or written the phrase “I’ll meet you at the pyramid”…

Nymphengarten Karlsruhe

For a city of 297,488 (in 2011, according to Wikipedia), Karlsruhe is pretty green. There are trees, flowers and small parks all over the place. The picture above was taken in the Nymphengarten, a small green space behind the Naturkundemuseum (Natural History Museum).

That’s thirteen photos, which is technically one too many (I thought I’d compensate for the terrible quality of the supermarket photos by including two images!), so it’s time for me to stop now. If you enjoyed this post, why not check out the rest of the series? The next stop on the world tour is Japan. Links to previous entries and a schedule for the rest of the series can be found on The Piri-Piri Lexicon.

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27 thoughts on “Neighbourhoods Around the World – Karlsruhe

  1. Brought back memories. Lived in Germany when my bits were young. Elephants were in the playgrounds then too and used to visit our schloss park on a Sunday morning then home via coffee gateau shop in time for Sunday roast – happy memories. Thank you 😃

  2. Ah, this makes me miss Germany! I spent a summer there and loved every minute of it. I’m hoping to make my way back someday, as there’s so much of Germany I still want to see 🙂

  3. I love this idea! I might have to do similar Manchester post at some point! So good to see where you live and find out a bit more about – as you can imagine, reading about all the different types of schools had me sat here in fair disbelief!!

    1. Ooh, you should do a post! I’d love to see where you live.

      The school system is one thing that really annoys me about Germany! How can you write off a child at ten years of age based on their performance at primary school?! Ever heard of late developers Germany?? It mostly annoys me cos I suspect I would never have made it to Gymnasium…

  4. Oh, the rain… In Bayern it rains a lot as well. Both my children first learned to say ‘rain’ before anything else weather related. Nice of you to show us around. Thank you!

  5. So fun to look at your neighborhood! I love seeing so many brick buildings. And I agree with Mud Hut Mama that the education system is fascinating. I am participating in the series next week, and I totally identify with being afraid of getting in trouble for taking some of my pictures! I was mainly worried taking photos of a school my kids don’t attend.

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